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7 results found

UNICEF Ethiopia/2017/Zerihun Sewunet
Journal Article

COVID-19 and pastoralism: reflections from three continents

How have COVID-19 disease control measures affected mobility and production practices, marketing opportunities, land control, labour relations, local community support and socio-political relations with the state and other settled agrarian or urban populations? This article reflects on five diverse cases…
Routledge
UNICEF/Cui
blog

COVID-19: The social science lessons we need to learn from Wuhan

5th March 2020
From the impact of city lockdowns to information control, fake news, medical supply shortages and impacts on social inequality, what…
UNICEF/Ma
blog

Where is social science in the Coronavirus response?

3rd February 2020
Social science networks can provide crucial support to stemming nCoV by promoting the understanding of the context-response relationship as emergent…
UNICEF/Cui
blog

Pandemics – social sciences are vital, but we must take the next steps

23rd January 2020
More than ever, social scientists and health policy-makers will need to work well together to address this latest potential pandemic.
UNICEF/UN0235946/Nybo
Evidence Reviews

Social Science in Epidemics: Influenza and SARS Lessons Learned zhfr

Summary and background reports exploring transmission, surveillance and other aspects of outbreaks.
SSHAP
2019
UNICEF/UNI172230/Kesner
Background Reports

Early Response to the Emergence of Influenza A(H7N9) Virus in Humans in China: The Central Role of Prompt Information Sharing and Public Communication

In 2003, China’s handling of the early stages of the epidemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was heavily criticized and generally considered to be suboptimal. Following the SARS outbreak, China made huge investments to improve surveillance, emergency preparedness and…
WHO
2014
UNICEF/UNI43619/Bannon
Background Reports

Famine in the Twentieth Century

More than 70 million people died in famines during the 20th century. This paper compiles excess mortality estimates from over 30 major famines and assess the success of some parts of the world – China, the Soviet Union, and more…
IDS
2000
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